Jason P. Young, M.D. - Orthopedic Sports Medicine & Sports Performance - St. Louis, Missouri
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Shoulder

Shoulder Anatomy :: Rotator Cuff Tear :: Shoulder Impingement
Shoulder Arthroscopy :: Frozen Shoulder :: Shoulder Joint Replacement :: Shoulder Instability
Glenohumeral Instability/Labral Tears :: Pec Rupture :: Clavicle Fractures :: Adhesive Capsulitis
Superior Labral Tears :: Weaver Dunn :: Clavicle and Proximal Humerus Fractures
Glenohumeral DJD and Shoulder Replacement :: AC Joint Arthrosis and Reconstruction
AC Joint Reconstruction – Modified Weaver Dunn :: Proximal Humerus Fractures

Normal Anatomy of the Shoulder Joint

How does the Shoulder joint work?
Find out more in this web based movie.

Normal Anatomy of the Shoulder Joint Arthroscopy of the Knee Joint  

Rotator Cuff Tear

Rotator cuff is the group of tendons in the shoulder joint providing support and enabling wider range of motion. Major injury to these tendons may result in tear of these tendons and the condition is called as rotator cuff tear.

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Rotator Cuff Tear Rotator Cuff Tear Rotator Cuff Tear

Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement is also called as swimmer's shoulder, tennis shoulder, or rotator cuff tendinitis. It is the condition of inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder joint caused by motor vehicle accidents, trauma, and while playing sports such as tennis, baseball, swimming and weight lifting.

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Shoulder Impingement Shoulder Impingement Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder Arthroscopy

Shoulder arthroscopy is a surgical procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into the shoulder joint. The benefits of arthroscopy are smaller incisions, faster healing, a more rapid recovery, and less scarring. Arthroscopic surgical procedures are often performed on an outpatient basis and the patient is able to return home on the same day.

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Shoulder Arthroscopy Shoulder Arthroscopy Shoulder Arthroscopy

Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder is the condition of painful shoulder limiting the movements because of pain and inflammation. It is also called as adhesive capsulitis and may progress to the state where an individual may feel very hard to move the shoulder.

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Frozen Shoulder Frozen Shoulder Frozen Shoulder

Shoulder Joint Replacement

Shoulder joint replacements are usually done to relieve pain and when all non-operative treatment to relieve pain have failed.

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Shoulder Joint Replacement Shoulder Joint Replacement Shoulder Joint Replacement

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder instability is a chronic condition that causes frequent dislocations of the shoulder joint. A dislocation occurs when the end of the humerus (the ball portion) partially or completely dislocates from the glenoid (the socket portion) of the shoulder. A partial dislocation is referred to as a subluxation whereas a complete separation is referred to as a dislocation.

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Shoulder Instability Shoulder Instability Shoulder Instability

Glenohumeral Instability/Labral Tears

Glenohumeral instability (shoulder instability) is a chronic condition that causes frequent dislocations of the shoulder joint. A dislocation occurs when the end of the humerus (the ball portion) partially or completely dislocates from the glenoid (the socket portion) of the shoulder. A partial dislocation is referred to as a subluxation whereas a complete separation is referred to as a dislocation.

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Glenohumeral Instability/Labral Tears

Pec Rupture

The pectoralis muscle is a large muscle that is located in front of your chest and helps to move your shoulder forwards and across your chest. The pectoralis muscle is divided into the pectoralis major and the pectoralis minor. The pectoralis major muscle is the larger muscle and helps to push the arms in front of the body.

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Pec Rupture

Clavicle Fractures

Clavicle fracture, also called broken collarbone is a very common sports injury seen in people who are involved in contact sports such as football and martial arts as well as impact sports such as motor racing. A direct blow over the shoulder that may occur during a fall on an outstretched arm or a motor vehicle accident may cause the clavicle bone to break.

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Clavicle Fractures

Adhesive Capsulitis

Frozen shoulder, also called adhesive capsulitis is a condition characterized by pain and loss of motion in shoulder joint. It commonly affects the left shoulder than right and occurs more often in women than men. The exact cause of frozen shoulder is not known. It is most commonly associated with diabetes and a few other endocrine diseases. The main symptoms include pain, stiffness, and decreased motion of the shoulder.

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Adhesive Capsulitis

Superior Labral Tears

The shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint. A 'ball' at the top of the upper arm bone (the humerus) fits neatly into a 'socket', called the glenoid, which is part of the shoulder blade (scapula). The term SLAP (superior –labrum anterior-posterior) lesion refers to an injury of the superior labrum of the shoulder. The labrum is a ring of fibrous cartilage surrounding the glenoid for stabilization of the shoulder joint. The biceps tendon attaches inside the shoulder joint at the superior labrum of the shoulder joint. The biceps tendon is a long cord-like structure which attaches the biceps muscle to the shoulder and helps to stabilize the joint.

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Superior Labral Tears

Weaver Dunn

Coming soon

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Weaver Dunn

Clavicle and Proximal Humerus Fractures

Coming soon

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Clavicle and Proximal Humerus Fractures

Glenohumeral DJD and Shoulder Replacement

Glenohumeral degenerative joint disease (GDJD), also known as osteoarthritis of the shoulder, is a condition characterized by degeneration or wearing away of the protective cartilage that covers the ends of your bones (articular cartilage). As a result of degeneration of the articular cartilage the ends of the two bones rub together and form bony growths (osteophytes).

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Glenohumeral DJD and Shoulder Replacement

AC Joint Arthrosis and Reconstruction

Acromioclavicular (AC) joint arthrosis or osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint is a condition that develops when the cartilage cushioning the AC joint in the shoulder begins to wear out. The shoulder is a 'ball-and-socket' joint. A 'ball' at the top of the upper arm bone, humerus, fits neatly into a 'socket', the glenoid, which is part of the shoulder blade, scapula. The shoulder joint is made up of three bones, the collarbone (clavicle), scapula (shoulder bone), and humerus (arm bone). The AC joint is located where the clavicle meets the end of the shoulder blade, acromion.

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AC Joint Arthrosis and Reconstruction

AC Joint Reconstruction – Modified Weaver Dunn

The acromioclavicular joint (AC joint) is one of the 3 joints in the shoulder and connects the clavicle (collar bone) to the scapula (shoulder blade). The AC joint is held with 4 main ligaments, the superior (above the joint) and inferior (below the joint) ligaments, the coracoclavicular ligaments, and the coracoacromial ligament.

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AC Joint Arthrosis and Reconstruction

Proximal Humerus Fractures

Humerus is the upper arm bone and it forms two joints —shoulder joint and elbow joint. The proximal humerus is the upper end of arm bone that forms shoulder joint. Fractures of proximal humerus are common in elderly individuals suffering from osteoporosis. Fractures are caused by traumatic injuries such as a fall on outstretched hand from greater heights or motor vehicle accidents. In younger individuals a severe trauma can cause these fractures.

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AC Joint Arthrosis and Reconstruction

Streaming Videos

Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopaedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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rthroscopy Association of North America
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Partners for the Advancement of Surgical Education
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Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas
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Hawkins Foundation
SSM Physical Therapy

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