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  • Lifelong physical activity increases bone density in men

    Men have many reasons to add high-impact and resistance training to their exercise regimens; these reasons include building muscle and shedding fat. Now a researcher has determined another significant benefit to these activities: building bone mass. The study found that individuals who continuously participated in high-impact activities, such as jogging and tennis, during adolescence and young adulthood, had greater hip and lumbar spine bone mineral density than those who did not.

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  • Lifelong physical activity increases bone density in men

    Men have many reasons to add high-impact and resistance training to their exercise regimens; these reasons include building muscle and shedding fat. Now a researcher has determined another significant benefit to these activities: building bone mass. The study found that individuals who continuously participated in high-impact activities, such as jogging and tennis, during adolescence and young adulthood, had greater hip and lumbar spine bone mineral density than those who did not.

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  • Care of Shoulder Pain in the Overhead Athlete

    Shoulder complaints are common in the overhead athlete. Understanding the biomechanics of throwing and swimming requires understanding the importance of maintaining the glenohumeral relationship of the shoulder.

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  • Hamstring injuries in baseball may be preventable

    Creating a program to prevent hamstring injuries in minor league and major league baseball players might be a possibility say researchers presenting their work today...

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  • Quadriceps exercise relieves pain in knee osteoarthritis

    A quadriceps isometric contraction exercise method is effective for relieving pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA), according to a study published online May 25 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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  • Comparable results seen with high- vs low-intensity plyometric exercise after ACL reconstruction

    Results from this randomized controlled trial showed both low- and high-intensity plyometric exercise for rehabilitation following ACL reconstruction positively affected knee function, knee impairments and psychological status among patients after 8 weeks of intervention.

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  • Carpal Tunnel Up With Increased Electronic Device Use

    Extended use of smartphones and other hand-held electronic devices leads to an increased risk of carpal tunnel syndrome, according to a study published online June 21 in Muscle & Nerve.

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  • What is Iliotibial Band (ITB) Syndrome?

    Pain along the outside of the knee can be debilitating to an athlete causing severe pain during running, squatting, stair climbing, or cycling activities. The iliotibial band (ITB) is a thick connective tissue that runs from the outside of the iliac crest (pelvic bone),...

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  • What is Shoulder Impingement?

    Now that spring is upon us, you may hear the term “shoulder impingement” more often. It is commonly seen in athletes who participate in overhead sports such as softball, baseball, tennis, swimming, and volleyball but can occur....

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  • How Long Does it Take to Play Sports After an ACL Reconstruction?

    This topic is dependent on a few factors. First, is this the 1st reconstruction? Most athletes will return to actual competitive play within 9 months, some a little less and others up to a year.

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